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Unmasking Modern Slavery Seminars

Modern slavery is the fastest growing illegal trade in the world and second biggest. It conservatively affects over 40million people making it bigger than any other point in human history. In November 2018, the Australian Parliament passed the Australian Modern Slavery Act. It has made us a world leader in fighting this hideous crime. We are connected most with it, through the things that we buy and the services we may use. 

STOP THE TRAFFIK Australia has been working in this area with partners for over 12 years and is a coalition of organisations working together to prevent, disrupt and end slavery. The ways we best achieve this is by becoming informed, educated and motivated. 

These sessions to help people not only understand what is happening – but also know our part in how we can be involved in stopping and further preventing it. 

Request Form

The following form needs to be completed by a teacher (or equivalent) indicating when you would like us to consider conducting seminars at your school.

Name *
Name
Please come to our school
Address *
Address
Address of school
Please indicate the time of day your prefer on these dates *
It is assumed each of these covers 2 lessons in most school timetables. Lunchtime sessions can be added on days we are already attending the school.
For example the subject areas this is connected with such as Humanities and Social Science, English, History, Textiles and Fashion, Legal Studies, Art, ......
Phone for contact person
Phone for contact person

 Options:

  • Single lesson with combined year(s) group ~ 40 minutes

  • Double Lesson combined year group / junior high school / senior high school ~ 80 minutes

  • School Assembly (or Chapel in faith-based schools) ~ 12-15+ minutes

  • Lesson sessions in subject areas ~ 40 minutes

  • Interest groups of students (such as Amnesty, Vinnies, Social Justice groups)

  • Sessions with teachers

  • Evening session with parents

Presenters

National Directors of STOP THE TRAFFIK Australia, Carolyn Kitto and Fuzz Kitto

Between them they have worked and presented in 47 countries around the world and have first-hand, on the ground experience on how modern slavery happens and what we can do as individuals and communities. Their style motivational, educational and inspirational.

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Carolyn Kitto– has worked in youth work, aid and development, community development, training and is a much sought after speaker in this area.

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Fuzz Kitto – has spoken to over ¾ million school students across Australasia. He is a Youth Worker and gifted communicator with young people.

Teaching Resources for Schools

These resources are intended for use by primary, junior and senior high school students.

We have developed a lesson plan and Power Point presentation for both Cocoa and Fashion. These introduce concepts of child labour and labour exploitation through exploring where chocolate and clothes come from.

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For Senior Students, the Hall of Records on the website In Plain Sight contains a selection of PDF reports, interactive websites, video clips, testimonies and infographics.

Designed to provide students with the essential information regarding child labour and trafficking into both Ghana and Côte dʼIvore for cocoa farming, and human trafficking and labour exploitation in the fashion industry.

There are also a number of further reading reports and articles which are intended for investigation into underlying causes, perspectives and issues around child labour, the poverty line, living incomes, labour exploitation and human trafficking. 

We have organised these resources in a way that encourage and develop research and literacy skills. We encourage students to take the time to consider each of the resources and determine those which are most applicable to their assessment brief.

 

SUPPORTED BY  A grant from the Department of Home Affairs enabled the development of these seminars and resources. Following the ending of the grant, a fee will need to be charged for seminars. Resources are free for use by schools.

SUPPORTED BY

A grant from the Department of Home Affairs enabled the development of these seminars and resources. Following the ending of the grant, a fee will need to be charged for seminars. Resources are free for use by schools.