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Key Note Speakers

Andrew Wallis OBE, is Founder and CEO of the UK Charity Unseen (www.unseen.org ), a multi-award winning charity, 'working towards a world without slavery'. Chairman of the Working Group for the Centre for Social Justice’s landmark report: ‘It Happens Here: Equipping the United Kingdom to fight modern slavery’ which gave a comprehensive road map for government, statutory authorities and business to eradicate slavery in the UK and now acknowledged as the catalyst for the UK’s Modern Slavery Act. He advises and collaborates with statutory agencies and businesses on how to combat and eradicate modern slavery.

In 2013, he won the Influencer Award from the Directory for Social Change and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and Fellow of the Centre for Social Justice in recognition of his work in combating modern slavery and human trafficking. In 2015, he was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for services to the Eradication of Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery.

He has also worked with politicians to bring the Transparency in UK Company Supply Chains (Eradication of Slavery) Bill before Parliament and was a member of the Modern Slavery Bill Evidence Review that worked on the Modern Slavery Bill. He works internationally with NGOs and businesses to develop a coordinated response to modern slavery. A former member of the UK Government’s Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group (IDMG) on Modern Slavery and Chair of the Modern Slavery Joint Strategy Group at the UK Home Office. He is a member of the EU Civil Society Platform on Trafficking in Human Beings. Andrew works regularly with media outlets such as BBC News and Radio; Sky News; Al Jazeera; CNN; The Guardian; The Sunday Times; and BBC World Service.

Prior to founding Unseen Andrew had a career in commercial management in the retail sector and business analysis in the IT sector, project management with the University of the West of England and led a church. He currently serves on the board of a number of charities.

 

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 Justine Currell, is Executive Director of Unseen UK (www.unseen.org ), which she joined following a 28.5 year career in the civil service.  During that time she held a variety of operational and policy posts working across a number of UK Government departments. For the last five years of her civil service career, Justine was the modern slavery senior policy adviser in the Home Office and led on development of the Modern Slavery Act, including the transparency in supply chains provision and business guidance, working closely with Ministers, businesses and international colleagues.  

Since joining Unseen in May 2016, Justine has been called upon to provide her insight and experience on the issue of modern slavery to media and law enforcement agencies. She has specifically provided support to a number of key businesses on developing their response to supply chain transparency and is highly regarded in this field.  She has joined Unseen to lead the development of the enhanced modern slavery helpline and resource centre and Unseen’s work with businesses on supply chain transparency, including the central registry for business transparency statements, Tiscreport.  Justine seeks to use her experience and knowledge of working with UK Ministers to influence other Governments internationally to take action to address modern slavery and, in particular, business supply chain issues.

Other speakers

Include US Embassy staff, government officials, NGOs and researchers, who will take part, and the significant issues they will be addressing, such as,

  • •      Transparency in supply chains-ethical business practices,
  • •      The role of the consumer,
  • •      Moving beyond ‘band aid’ fixes to addressing the causal factors which continue to perpetuate the crime
  • •      Consumer campaigns – what could be done? How do they work? What good examples can be draw from?
  • •      Targeting unchained buyers – what could be done? What mechanisms are in place? What are the good         examples?
  • •      Disruption – how can we disrupt access of bad companies to workers?
  • •      Effective pressure on governments – what might be achieved?

For general conference enquiries email Chris Frazer on chrismf@hotmail.co.nz cell phone +64274425065