www.buyslavefree.org

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One of the great development in addressing human trafficking and modern slavery in the prawn (shrimp) supply chain is the Seafood Task Force. It brings together multi-stakeholder alliance consisting of retailers, their suppliers, NGOs and the major Thai shrimp processors and feed companies. To read more about the Task Force go to http://www.seafoodtaskforce.global/aims-objectives/

Our petition calls on this group to work together to develop, Sustainable and Slave Free Fishing Standard that is third party verified, with a recognisable logo which can be used by retailers, restaurants and take-away shops. Then you can know reasonable steps have been taken for a slave free, sustainable supply chain for the seafood you purchase from South East Asia. 

We will pass you first name, last initial and the country you are from on to the members.

To the Thai Seafood Task Group
I am aware of the reported labour and environmental abuses in the Asian fishing industry such as human trafficking, slavery and over fishing through illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Steps and standards have emerged but they don’t help me when I am purchasing my seafood. As a consumer, I am wanting: 
A Sustainable Slave Free Fishing Standard that is third party verified, with a recognisable logo, which can be used by retailers, restaurants and take away stores to show reasonable steps have been taken for a slave free, sustainable supply chain in the seafood I purchase from South East Asia.
Name *
Name

Prawn Supply Chain

Whether farmed or wild there are reports of human trafficking and slavery in on the fishing boats connected with the imported prawn supply chain. In the farming process, "Trash Fish" are caught in bottom dragging seine nets which pull up all seafood in their paths. This 'trash fish' is then processed into fishmeal to feed farmed prawns. 

A second key place where human trafficking, slavery and child labour happens is in the peeling sheds and processing factories. 

PrawnSupplyChain.png

Our Advent seafood Calendar brings you a Traffik-free christmas

Clip on the icon below to link to more information:-

On average, a large ship sinks every four days and between 2,000 and 6,000 seamen die annually, typically because of avoidable accidents linked to lax safety practices.
— New York Times
Thailand is one of the worst human trafficking hubs on earth. It has been black-listed for the past two years.
— US State Department
After being sold to the factory, they were trapped with nearly 100 other Burmese migrants. Children worked alongside them, including a girl so tiny she had to stand on a stool to reach the peeling table.
— news.com.au
Last year, more than 5,200 seafarers were attacked by pirates and robbers and more than 500 were taken hostage
— New York Times Database

Read the New York Times series 'The Outlaw Ocean' on the lawlessness of the high seas. Ian Urbina reveals that crime and violence in international waters often goes unpunished.